Thinking
An interesting segmentation that goes beyond elephants and donkeys – lessons from the US electorate
An interesting new report looking at the US political landscape was published this week (see the end of this article). Why interesting? It’s a good example of a nice-looking segmentation - examining American public opinion through the lens of seven population segments. The report’s authors describe these segments as “America’s hidden tribes” - hidden because they have shared beliefs, values, and identities that shape the way they see the world, rather than visible external traits such as age, race or gender. By avoiding the use of demographic information or other observables – the authors contend – segments go beyond conventional categories and identify people’s most basic psychological differences. The tribes identified are: Progressive Activists: highly engaged, secular, cosmopolitan, angry.Traditional Liberals: open to...
Innovation doesn’t necessarily equate to disruption – a case study in a bag!
Having just written a piece on ‘disruptors’ (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/who-disrupt-insurance-industry-adam-riley/), I thought this FT article looked interesting … A trolley-load of new luggage brands has appeared in recent years, trying to disrupt a staid market with promises of revolutionary ways to pack a bag As someone who typically packs a bag once a week for some trip or another I wanted to find out what I had been missing and how someone was going to revolutionise this task for me … I hadn’t realised it had been such a chore. But more than 40 luggage entrepreneurs seeking crowd funding on Indiegogo and Kickstarter can’t be wrong, What’s the big deal? Well it’s not down to looks … if you check out these...
Education in the fourth industrial age – do we just have our collective heads in the sand?
his week Andy Haldane, chief economist of the Bank of England, has warned that the UK will need a skills revolution to avoid large swathes of people becoming technologically unemployed as artificial intelligence makes many jobs obsolete. Should we fear the rise of the machines? Or ‘That robot stole my job’!  In our 2017 article ... http://decision-architects.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/That-Robot-Stole-My-Job.pdf  ...we discussed that while the technological wave may hold out the hope of new jobs – as yet undefined – this is going to require a route and branch rethink about how we educate people in the UK. 75% of school leavers will not have the skills to compete in this new world … who is prepared to grapple with this issue today?
‘Segments of One’ – myth or reality?
How many segments is too many? At some point we always have this conversation. Clients usually find 4 too few and 12 too many (leave aside that it’s not about how many but rather how you prioritise). So the spectre of ‘segments of one’ leaves us scratching our heads – an existential crisis for those of us who get paid to package the market up into somewhere between 4 and 12 homogenous groups; and paralysing for clients who now have (pick a big number) a million segments of one. But is it? And what does ‘segments of one’ actually mean? In trying to get our collective heads around ‘segments of one’ we keep coming back to the difference between segmentation and...
‘To sleep, perchance to dream’ … a potentially big impact on an SMEs bottom line
A few weeks ago we wrote an article on employer provided benefits (“EPBs”) – and over the past year we have explored the role of EPBs in SMEs (apologies for the initialism). So, this statistic caught our attention. A Harvard University study[1] found that in the US, insomnia is the root cause of the loss of 11.3 days’ worth of productivity per person per year. The number of people sleeping less than the recommended level is on the rise – as a result of a range of factors including our modern 24/7 society, electronic media use and the ‘always on’ work culture. Not only is a lack of sleep associated with a range of negative lifestyle, social and health issues that result in...
SMEs are positively embracing the auto-enrolment pension – but feel the pension industry is not delivering
63% of SMEs reported that the auto-enrolment pension had a positive impact on the way employees thought about the business Recent research conducted by Decision Architects has found that over 60% of SMEs reported that the auto-enrolment pension had a positive impact on the way employees thought about the business AND furthermore two thirds of these businesses are currently paying more than the minimum contribution – showing a higher level of engagement than might have been expected. While the scheme could have been seen as a box that employers had to tick to meet legal requirements … instead they are embracing auto-enrolment as an opportunity to improve their relationship with their employees. 64% of SMEs are currently paying more than...
The Benefits Balance – what really matters to employees?
Since the financial crisis of 2008, the business of employing staff has seen a seismic shift in the power balance – the candidates are now in the driving seat. The right employee benefits are now a priority for businesses looking to attract (and keep) high caliber candidates. Employers are offering a host of benefits from coffee bars to craft beers, free fruit to a fun-filled playground. With employee perks revolutionizing the workplace, what are the benefits that matter to employees? Which of the benefits, whether financial or lifestyle, help employees to choose or stay with a company? The Buzz About Benefits Employee benefits are nothing new. In the mid-19th century Cadbury Brothers provided housing and sports facilities, arranged works outings...
Looking a gift horse in the mouth … assessing the ‘impact’ of your auto-enrolment pension
Many auto-enrolment pension policies are now approaching their anniversary. This offers SMEs a chance to take stock and reflect, but just how many will? In many cases, simply fulfilling the obligation has been, and will be, satisfactory – just another box ticked to ensure that they are meeting the legal requirements. Put to the back of the mind and forgotten. But how many others will seriously consider switching providers? There will be some who want to reduce the monthly costs paid for the policy - just like any other business cost to be managed down as far as possible - which for any business will be a key consideration, particularly for smaller ones. For businesses who view auto-enrolment as a...
‘To sleep, perchance to dream’ … a potentially big impact on an SMEs bottom line
A few weeks ago we wrote an article on employer provided benefits (“EPBs”) – and over the past year we have explored the role of EPBs in SMEs (apologies for the initialism). So, this statistic caught our attention. A Harvard University study[1] found that in the US, insomnia is the root cause of the loss of 11.3 days’ worth of productivity per person per year. The number of people sleeping less than the recommended level is on the rise – as a result of a range of factors including our modern 24/7 society, electronic media use and the ‘always on’ work culture. Not only is a lack of sleep associated with a range of negative lifestyle, social and health issues that result in...
An interesting segmentation that goes beyond elephants and donkeys – lessons from the US electorate
An interesting new report looking at the US political landscape was published this week (see the end of this article). Why interesting? It’s a good example of a nice-looking segmentation - examining American public opinion through the lens of seven population segments. The report’s authors describe these segments as “America’s hidden tribes” - hidden because they have shared beliefs, values, and identities that shape the way they see the world, rather than visible external traits such as age, race or gender. By avoiding the use of demographic information or other observables – the authors contend – segments go beyond conventional categories and identify people’s most basic psychological differences. The tribes identified are: Progressive Activists: highly engaged, secular, cosmopolitan, angry.Traditional Liberals: open to...
Innovation doesn’t necessarily equate to disruption – a case study in a bag!
Having just written a piece on ‘disruptors’ (https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/who-disrupt-insurance-industry-adam-riley/), I thought this FT article looked interesting … A trolley-load of new luggage brands has appeared in recent years, trying to disrupt a staid market with promises of revolutionary ways to pack a bag As someone who typically packs a bag once a week for some trip or another I wanted to find out what I had been missing and how someone was going to revolutionise this task for me … I hadn’t realised it had been such a chore. But more than 40 luggage entrepreneurs seeking crowd funding on Indiegogo and Kickstarter can’t be wrong, What’s the big deal? Well it’s not down to looks … if you check out these...
Education in the fourth industrial age – do we just have our collective heads in the sand?
his week Andy Haldane, chief economist of the Bank of England, has warned that the UK will need a skills revolution to avoid large swathes of people becoming technologically unemployed as artificial intelligence makes many jobs obsolete. Should we fear the rise of the machines? Or ‘That robot stole my job’!  In our 2017 article ... http://decision-architects.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/That-Robot-Stole-My-Job.pdf  ...we discussed that while the technological wave may hold out the hope of new jobs – as yet undefined – this is going to require a route and branch rethink about how we educate people in the UK. 75% of school leavers will not have the skills to compete in this new world … who is prepared to grapple with this issue today?